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Hu^on College ^Bulletin 

VOL. V HURON, SOUTH DAKOTA NO. I 

Published Monthly by the Trustees of the College Subscription Price, 25 Cents 

REV, C. H. FRENCH, C D. < E>., Editor 
Entered as seeond Class Mail Matter at the Post Office at Huron, South Dakota 






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cANNUAL CATALOGUE OF 

Hu%on College 

HURON, SOUTH "DAKOTA 






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1 9 05-1906 



COLLEGE CALENDAR FOR 1905-1906 



SEPTEMBER 


MARCH 


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DECEMBER 


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FEBRUARY 


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Figures in heavy type indicate the days when the College is in session. 



CALENDAR 



FALL TERM— 1905 

Tuesday, September 19, 2 p. m Opening Exercises 

JuSrCeZS 1 3 ° j Thanking Kecess 

StSgWlSSSffill"} Term Examinations 

Thursday, December 21 Term Ends 

WINTER TERM— J906 

Tuesday, January 2, 2 p. m.. Term Begins 

Thursday, January 25 Day of Prayer for Colleges 

Friday, February 16 The F. H Kent Orations Due 

Thursday, February 22 Washington's Birthday 

Friday, March 16 The F. H. Kent Oratorical Contest 

Thursday, March 22 ) T Fxammations 

Friday, March 23 ) ierm examinations 

Friday, March 23 Term Ends 

SPRING TERM-J906 

Tuesday, April 3, 2 p. m Term Begins 

Wednesday, May 30 Decoration Day 

Friday, June 8,8 p.m... .The Thomas Maynard Declamation Contest 

Sunday, June 10 The Baccalaureate Sermon 

Sunday, June 10 ... * Y. M. C. A. Address 

Tuesday, June 12 / T Fiaminatinns 

Wednesday, June 13 \ l erm Examinations 

Monday, June 11, 8 p. m Recital, Musical Department 

Tuesday, June 12, 8 p. m. Commencement, Academy and Normal 

Departments. 
Wednesday, June 13, 8 p. m. Commencement, Commercial De- 
partment. 

Thursday, June 14, 11 a. m College Commencement 

3.30 p. m. Meeting of Board of Trustees 

8 p. m President's Reception 

SUMMER SCHOOL-1906. 

Monday, June 18, 9 a. m Summer Term Begins 

Friday, July 27 Summer Term Ends 

(See separate announcement for 1906 Summer School.) 



BOARD OF TRUSTEES 



J905 

Rev. John P. Williamson, D.D., Greenwood. 
Rev. Edwin Brown, Ph.D., Wolsey. 
Rev. C. C. Todd, Aberdeen. 
Rev. C. H. French, D.D., Huron. 
Mr. Fred M. Wilcox, Los Angeles, California. 
Rev. H. P. Carson, D.D., Scotland. 

1906 
Mr. N. E. Carnine, Aberdeen. 
Mrs. John L. Pyle, Huron. 
Rev. J. S. Butt, Groton. 
Mr. F. J. Carlisle, Brookings. 
Mr. E. H. Grant, Huron. 
Mr. J. H. Farnswortii, Hurley. m 

J907 
Rev. A. C. McCauley, Bridgewater. 
Mr. Coe I. Crawford, Huron. 
Rev. Hugh Robinson, Madison. 
Rev. J. P. Anderson, Huron. 
Mr. F. H. Kent, Huron. 
Mr. James H Dickson, Scotland. 
Mr. W. S. Preston, Huron. 



OFFICERS OF THE BOARD 



Mr. F. H. Kent, President. 

Rev. Edwin Brown, Vice-President. 
Mr. W. S. Preston, Secretary. 
Mr. Coe I. Crawford, Treasurer. 
Rev. C. H. French, Deputy Treasurer, 

To whom alJ remittances should be sent. 



EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE 



Mr. F. H Kent, Chairman. 
Mr. Coe i. Crawford. 
Mr. E. H. Grant. 

Rev. C. H. French. 

Rev. J. P. Anderson. 
Mrs. John L. Pyle. 

Mr. W. S. Preston, secretary. 



FACULTY 



R V. CALVIN H. FRENCH, A.M., D.D., 
President. 

LIZZIE J. ROBINSON, A.B., 
Latin. 

MARY A. T.AWNEY, A.M., 

. Mathematics. 

HARRY M. GAGE, A.M., 

Philosophy, Psychology. 

ELIZABETH REID, Pn.B., 
German, Rhetoric. 

REV. WILLIAM L. NOTESTEIN, A.M., 

Greek. 

MARTIN REMP, A.B., 
Principa' of Academy and Normal Departments. 

ROBERT B. MILLER, B.S., 

Natural Science. 



Elected since the faculty page was printed: 

CHAS. W. HOCHSTETLER, Ph. B. 
HISTORY 

JOSEPH AMOS PIPAL, 
ORATORY AND PHYSICAL DIRECTOR 



JOHN I. PASEK, 
Secretary. 



BOARD OF TRUSTEES 



J905 

Rev. John P. Williamson, D.D., Greenwood. 
Rev. Edwin Brown, Ph.D., Wolsey. 
Rev. C. C. Todd, Aberdeen. 
Rev. C. H. French, D.D., Huron. 
Mr. Fred M. Wilcox, Los Angeles, California. 
Rev. H. P. Carson, D.D., Scotland. 

1906 
Mr. N. E. Carnine, Aberdeen. 
Mrs. John L. Pyle, Huron. 
Rev. J. S. Butt, Groton. 
Mr. F. J. Carlisle, Brookings. 
Mr. E. H. Grant, Huron. 
Mr. J. H. Farnswortii, Hurley. m 

J907 
Rev. A. C. McCauley, Bridgewater. 
Mr. Coe I. Crawford, Huron. 
Rev. Hugh Robinson, Madison. 
Rev. J. P. Anderson, Huron. 
Mr. F. H. Kent, Huron. 
Mr. James H Dickson, Scotland. 
Mr. W. S. Preston, Huron. 



OFFICERS OF THE BOARD 



Mr. F. H. 1 

Rev. F 

Mr. ' 

Mb 

I 



Mr. F. H 
Mr. C( 

Mj 



TXEV. V . XX. xnm^vix. 

Rev. J. P. Anderson. 
Mrs. John L. Pyle. 

Mr. W. S. Preston, secretary. 



FACULTY 



R V. CALVIN H. FRENCH, A.M., D.D., 
President. 

LIZZIE J. ROBINSON, A.B., 
Latin. 

MARY A. TAWNEY, A.M., 
. Mathematics. 

HARRY M. GAGE, A.M., 
Philosophy, Psychology. 

ELIZABETH REID, Pn.B., 
German, Rhetoric. 

REV. WILLIAM L. NOTESTELN, A.M., 
Greek. 

MARTIN REMP, A.H., 

Principa 1 of Academy and Normal Departments. 

ROBERT B. MILLEK, B.S., 
Natural Science. 

EMIL ANDERSON, 

Director of Musical Department. 

KATHRY r N N. ADAMS, A.B., 
p]nglish. 

INA HOTALLING, 

Art. 

HATTIE E. VAN ARSDALK, 
Preceptress, Matron. 

JOHN I. PASEK, 
Secretarv. 



HURON BUSINESSGCOLLEGE 



FACULTY 



G M. LYNCH, 
Principal and Manager of Business Practice Department. 

FLORENCE M. LYNCH, 
Principal of Shorthand and Typewriting Department. 

MARY E. MEDBERY, 

Principal of English Department. 

ALVA E TAYLOR, D.C.L., 
Lecturer on Commercial Law. 



iiii l!i 




HURON COLLEGE 



Historical Statement— Pierre University was organized at Pierre by 
the Presbytery of Southern Dakota which was then a part of the 
Synod of Minnesota The original articles of incorporation were filed 
July 6, 1883, and the first term of school work was begun on Septem- 
ber 26th of the same year. The Synod of South Dakota being organ- 
ized October 9, 1883, the control of the institution was transferred by 
the Presbytery to the Synod, under which control it has since remained, 
the Synod electing its trustees and receiving its annual reports. 

Rev. Thomas M. Finley became the first president of the College, 
being succeeded after two years by the Rev. William M. Blackburn, 
D.D., LL.D., who remained in office until July, 1898. In 1886, the 
Presbytery of Southern Dakota organized Scotland Academy, at Scot- 
land. Later it became evident that the Presbyterian Church in so 
new a state could not support two institutions. During the years of 
drought and hard times both the College and the Academy languished, 
and in June, 1898, they were consolidated and removed to Huron under 
the name of Huron College. 

After thirteen years of rare devotion, Dr. Blackburn resigned the 
presidency and soon after died. Rev. C. H. French, until then a 
pastor at Scotland, became president and at once began the work of 
reorganization and rebuilding on the new foundations. Success at- 
tended the new movement Students came in increasing numbers, 



8 Huron College, Huron, S. D. 

and the College rapidly won its way in the confidence of the Synod 
and the state. 

In 1902 a systematic effort was begun to secure adequate grounds, 
buildings and endowment. The Chicago & North- Western Railway 
Company offered four blocks of ground for a campus. The women of 
Huron and the state pledged $5,000 towards the cost of a new dormi- 
tory. Mr. Ralph Voorhees, of Clinton, N. J., gave $15,000. Other 
subscriptions were obtained, and on October 8, 1904, the beautiful 
Elizabeth R. Voorhees Dormitory for Girls was dedicated. The deed 
to the campus was received from the railway company in February, 
1905. Upon the good material foundation thus laid, an institution 
large and symmetrical in its plan, thorough and thoroughly Christian 
in all its work, will grow through the years of the future. 

The City of Huron— The state of South Dakota is divided by nature 
into three very different portions; namely, an agricultural, a grazing, 
and a mining region. The agricultural region comprises all that part 
of the state lying east of the Missouri river, a little less than one-half 
of its entire area. 

The city of Huron is located almost exactly at the center of this 
agricultural region. 

Because of its location and its railway facilities, it is easy of access 
from all parts of the state. It is at the intersection of the two main 
lines of the Chicago & North- Western Railway in this state, and it is 
the terminus of one line of the Great Northern Railway. It is three 
hundred miles southwest from St. Paul and Minneapolis and six hun- 
dred and fifty miles northwest from Chicago. Its interests are trade 
with the surrounding country and towns, the shipment and distribu- 
tion of stock, grain and farm supplies, milling, and, to a limited 
extent, manufacturing. 

There are three newspapers, one of which is published as a daily. 
There are seven churches, including one of the strongest Presbyterian 
churches in the state. Several artesian wells supply the city with 
water, ample fire protection, and power for various mechanical plants. 
The population is four thousand. 

Aim of the College— Education should give mental discipline, in- 
crease personal power, develop moral character. Intellectually, it 
should train in the apprehension of facts and the comprehension of 
relations. It should establish habits of careful and thorough investi- 
gation, and just and logical deduction. 

It should result in ability and desire to apply all one's power in the 



Huron College, Huron, S. D. 9 

doing of life's work with the least waste and the largest beneficent 
effect. Whatever the environment, an education should give a com- 
pleter command over it. Through the merging of the life of the edu- 
cated man in that of his community there should be an added impetus 
to the onward and upward progress of the common life. 

Education is the development of a life created in the divine image. 
It should, therefore, lead daily to an increase of the divine likeness. 

Correct mental habits, right and effective relation with the world's 
life, increasing fulfillment of the soul's spiritual possibilities, these 
are the results of true education, and this kind of education the 
College aims to give. 

The Type of College Life— College life, like individual life, shows 
varying types. Student life at Huron is strongly Christian. This 
condition is partly the heritage of past years of sacrifice and devotion 
as shown in the history of the institution, partly the result of the 
present aim and plan of the trustees, and partly the fruit of the per- 
sonal purpose, life and consecration of the teachers now constituting 
the faculty. The life of the student body is remarkably free from 
things that are trivial or debasing. The highest ideals are sought and 
the most unselfish purposes are cherished. Out of such student life 
strong character and good citizenship must come. 

Organization and Government— The College is under the manage- 
ment of the Presbyterian Synod of South Dakota. The Synod elects 
the Trustees, who are divided into three classes which serve three 
years each. They must not be less than five nor more than twenty- 
four in number, and two-thirds of them must be members of the 
Presbyterian church. This Hoard of Trustees appoints the faculty 
and administers all the affairs of the school. They meet statedly 
twice a year, and at other times on the call of the President of the 
Board. In the interval, an executive committee has charge of all 
college affairs. 

Not a Sectarian College — The College is Presbyterian, but not sec- 
tarian. There is no teaching of denominational doctrine and no effort 
to influence students in behalf of the Presbyterian church rather than 
any other church which they or their friends may prefer. In its own 
locality the College receives sympathy and help from people of all 
denominations and from many of none. It opens its doors freely to 
all, asking only that they come with an earnest desire to learn and 
serve the truth. 



10 Huron|. College, Huron, S. D. 

Home Life— It is of the greatest importance that a real home life be 
provided for young people who may be for the first time away from 
their own homes. This the College aims to give, surrounding the 
students with all needful restraints, while, at the same time, making 
the conditions of school life as agreeable as possible. 

The preceptress will be in personal charge of the conduct of the 
girls in the dormitory. Similar arrangements will be made for the 
management of the boys' dormitory, and the greatest care will be 
taken to bring the refining influences of home life into the lives of the 
students. 

Student Self Support— In a country as new as that around Huron, 
many students are compelled to earn their own expenses if they attend 
college at all. For this reason the college charges are made as low as 
possible and every effort is made to secure employment for students 
who need it. The College cannot promise to obtain work for all 
needy students, but all the assistance possible will gladly be given to 
such young people. A large proportion of the students have always 
been able to earn a part or all of their expenses during the school 
year. 

The College Board— The Board of Aid for Colleges and Academies 
was reorganized by the General Assembly of 1904, and is now the Col- 
lege Board of the Presbyterian church, with offices in New York City. 
It aims to aid Presbyterian Colleges wherever they may be, but its 
special effort at present is toward the establishing of certain colleges 
in the newer parts of the West. The institutions to -be helped are 
selected in view of their strategic locations, the quality of the work 
done and the purpose and responsibility of faculties and trustees. 
The colleges seeking aid are thoroughly investigated by the Board. 
For those deemed worthy of aid, adequate amounts for current ex- 
penses and large sums for endowments will be sought. Huron College 
has the warmest interest of the Board and will be aided to the extent 
of its power. 



Huron College, Huron, S. D. 



11 




THE ELIZABETH R. VOORHEES DORMITORY FOR GIRLS 

This beautiful building, completed and occupied in September, 1904, 
was secured to the College by the self sacrificing efforts of the women 
of South Dakota, supplemented by the generous gift of Mr. Ralph 
Voorhees, of Clinton, ^N. J. Under the leadership of Mrs. John L. 
Pyle the women of all the churches of Huron and the Presbyterian 
churches outside of Huron gave $5,000, to which Mr. Voorhees added 
$15,000 and named the building in honor of his wife. About $6,000 
was obtained from other subscriptions, and the completed building, 
exclusive of its furnishings, cost $26,000. The material used for the 
body of the building is a pink pressed brick, the trimmings being 
gray pressed brick and Kasota stone. The interior finish is birch, the 
walls and ceilings being hard plaster tinted in soft colors. The build- 
ing is heated throughout by steam and lighted by electricity. It 
affords homelike accommodations for over sixty young women. On 
the ground floor the large kitchen and dining room provide for the 
college boarding club in which all students who wish may obtain table 
board at very moderate rates. 

Other Improvements— A portion of the central heating plant has 
been installed from which heat is furnished for the new dormitory. 
When completed, this plant will supply heat for the entire group of 
proposed buildings. The Paul Vacuum System of Steam Heating 
has been adopted. This system secures greater economy of fuel and 
better results than the older systems of heating by steam. The por- 
tion of the heating plant already installed has cost about $7,000. A 
two-inch artesian well has been sunk and sewers put in at an addi- 
tional cost of over $1,000. The well has a pressure of about forty 
pounds to the square inch and gives an abundant supply of water for 
the buildings and campus. 



12 Huron College, Huron, S. D. 

Bequests— Some who can not now give as much as they wish may 
desire that their names and work should live after them in this insti- 
tution. Such persons are earnestly requested to consider making be- 
quests in favor of the College. The legal, corporate name of the in- 
stitution is "Huron College." The following may be found to be a 
convenient form of bequest : 

"I give and bequeath to Huron College, a corporation, at Huron, 

South Dakota, 

>? 

[f real estate is given by bequest, the word "devise," with a legal 
description of the real estate, should be inserted. The president of 
the College will be glad to correspond with any who may contemplate 
making a bequest or a gift in any form. 

STUDENT ORGANIZATIONS. 

Young Men's Christian Association— The Young Men's Christian 
Association of Huron College was organized in the fall of 1898, the 
year which marked the beginning of the College in Huron. The As- 
sociation has steadily grown, both in the extent of its work and in its 
influence over the lives of the men attending the institution. 

Like other associations of its class, its work is largely under the 
direction and supervision of the State and International Committees, 
and has been well and increasingly represented in all the conventions 
held in connection with the College Association work. As an indica- 
tion of its progressive spirit, it may be stated that the number of dele- 
gates sent to the Lake Geneva Conference, Lake Geneva, Wisconsin* 
has steadily increased, and the same can be said of its annual repre- 
sentation at the state conventions. This year fifteen delegates were 
sent to the convention held at Mitchell, S. D. Huron was the only 
South Dakota Association represented at the International Confer- 
ence held in Buffalo, N. Y., last May, two delegates being sent. 

Daily Devotional Bible Study Classes and Mission Study Classes, in 
which are used the Courses outlined by the International Committee, 
are organized. Regular weekly meetings are held, especially adapted 
to meet the needs of college men, and Personal Workers' Groups are 
formed whose chief purpose is to lead men into the Christian life. 

A budget of $250 which was estimated to meet the needs of the 
work for the present year, shows something of the extent of the work. 
The Association has also conducted each year a high grade lecture 



Huron College, Huron, S. D. 13 

and entertainment course, the expense of which for the present year 
is $750. 

The Association's chief end and aim in all of its work is the devel- 
opment of its members into noble, Christian characters, and to bring 
its influence to bear, for truth and right living, upon every man who 
comes within the walls of the institution. 

Young Woman's Christian Association— Motto: "Not by might, 
nor power, but by my spirit, saith the Lord of Hosts." The Y. W. C. 
A. of Huron College was organized in February, 1900. Its growth has 
been rapid and substantial. It is the purpose of the Association to 
bring the girls nearer together, to lead the non-Christians to Christ 
and to deepen the spiritual life of all. Prayer meetings are held 
every Thursday evening at the Voorhees Dormitory, where there is a 
room set apart for the special use of the Association. These meetings 
are bright and interesting and well attended. 

The aim of the Missionary Department is to create an intelligent 
interest among the girls in the extension of the Kingdom of Christ. 
There is a class in Mission Study which recites every week. Each 
month there is held a union meeting for the purpose of creating a gen- 
eral interest in mission work. 

Each year, delegates are sent to the state convention and also to the 
national conference held at Lake Geneva, Wisconsin. No girl can at- 
tend one of these conferences and not be greatly benefited. 

Athletics— Unless the College can control athletics, athletics will, 
ultimately, control the College. The latter condition would be de- 
plorable. Athletics have a proper and necessary place in college life. 
The authorities of Huron College aim to find that place, and then, in 
every proper way, to encourage and control this part of college life. 

Oratory — There is no more important department of college work 
than that of oratory. He who would lead or influence others must be 
able to express effectively his own thought and feeling. The Stu- 
dents' Association works in close connection with the Oratorical De- 
partment of the College. A local contest in oratory is held at the 
close of the winter term each year. The winner of this contest repre- 
sents the College in the state intercollegiate contest in May. 

Intercollegiate Debating -A plan for intercollegiate debating has 
been adopted by the four colleges in the state. Each college selects a 
team as its representative . These four teams meet in pairs for two 



14 Huron College, Huron, S. D. 

preliminary debates. The winning teams meet for a final debate, the 
winner of which becomes thus the champion of the state. 

Literary Societies The Blackburnian Literary Society is named in 
honor of the former president of the College, Rev. William M Black- 
burn, D.D. Its membership is limited to students doing college work. 
The Philomathian Literary Society is open to all students. In addi- 
tion to these two societies, a " Girls' Literary Society " has been in 
existence during the past three years. By invitation of the students, 
a member of the faculty usually acts as critic during the society meet- 
ings. The college management encourages the students in these and 
all similar organizations. 

Library and Reading Room— The library contains four thousand 
well selected volumes. More than one-half of these were included in 
Dr. Blackburn's private library which was secured by the College after 
his death. This collection was particularly strong in History. Pur- 
chases of books are made from time to time as money is available. A 
number of valuable donations have been received. Two donations 
which deserve particular mention were a complete set of the author- 
ized edition of the Encyclopedia Brittanica from Mr. Selah B. Strong, 
of Setauket, N. Y., and a partial set of Blackwood's Magazine, a set 
of Kidpath's History and other volumes from Mrs. J. F. Winslow, of 
Poughkeepsie, N. Y. Word has also been received that a considerable 
part of a valuable library in the East will be given to the College by 
bequest. Other similar gifts or an endowment for the library would 
be most welcome. 

In addition to the general library, the College has a large collection 
of the publications of the United States government, having been for 
many years a depository for these publications. As these books are 
classified and, for the most part, carefully indexed, they are of great 
value. During the past year the reading-room has received regularly 
daily papers, local weeklies, The Saturday Evening Post, The Scien- 
tific American, The Nation, The Outlook, Harper's Weekly, Public 
Opinion, The New York Times, Saturday Keview, and most of the 
better monthly magazines. 

Museum — Dr. Blackburn's collection of geological specimens is ar- 
ranged in the building. The "bad lands" of South Dakota are among 
the richest fossil fields in the world. Dr. Blackburn traveled exten- 
sively over these regions, and his collections contain many rare speci- 
mens. The banks of the Missouri, cutting through many formations, 
have added their contributions until the collection is one of the best 



Huron CoPege, Huron, S. D. 15 

for practical work. The collection is one of great value to the College 
both because of its intrinsic worth and because of its association with 
Dr. Blackburn. 

College Paper— "Purple and Gold," the College paper, is now in its 
fifth year. It has given a valuable business and literary training to 
the students who have acted as managers and editors. It has also 
done much to develop college spirit. No effort will be spared to make 
the paper in the future a true exponent of college life and an interest- 
ing medium of communication between the College and its friends. 

Prizes— The F. H. Kent Prize of twenty-five dollars is offered by 
the friend whose name it bears to the winner of the home contest in 
oratory. 

The Thomas Maynard Prize is offered by Mrs. William M. Grif- 
fith, Jamaica, N. Y., in memory of her father. It consists of twenty- 
five dollars to be awarded in a first prize of fifteen dollars and a second 
prize of ten dollars to the winners of the first and second places in a 
contest in declamation to be held at the close of the spring term. 

The Robert C. Gibbs Prize consists of a Webster's Unabridged 
Dictionary and is offered to the student in the Academy or Normal 
Departments who has the highest general standing for the year. In 
awarding this prize, in accordance with the desire of Mr. Gibbs, con- 
sideration is given to any special difficulties under which students 
labor who are compelled to earn a part or all of their expenses. 

Scholarships — A considerable amount of scholarship aid muslt be 
given to students each year. To meet this need, the endowment of 
scholarships is desired. One scholarship of $1,000 has been promised 
by Mrs. Mariah Blossom, of Brighton, N. Y., and another of $500 is 
being established by Rev. J. C. Ely, D. D., of Morgantown, W. V. 

Summer School— Teachers, more than almost any other class of 
workers, need to do advanced work continually if they would " keep 
up with the times." During the past four years a summer school of 
six weeks has been managed by the faculty of the College in conjunc- 
tion with the County Superintendent. The Summer term begins im- 
mediately after the college commencement and continues six weeks. 
The work is arranged with especial reference to the needs of teachers 
in the public schools who can not spare time to attend school during 
the regular school months. Credit is given on the regular Normal or 
Academy Courses for work done in the summer school. The Summer 
term begins this year on June 12th and continues until July 21st. 



16 Huron College, Huron, S. D. 

Correspondence with regard to the summer school may be addressed 
to the president of the College. 

EXPENSES 

TUITION 

Regular Fee — In the College, Academy and Normal Departments, 
tuition is $10 per term. If within two weeks after the opening of the 
fall term, tuition in any of these departments is paid in advance for 
the year, a redaction of $5 is allowed. 

Half Tuition— Ministers' children, or students preparing for the 
ministry will, if it is desired, be given a reduction of one-half on 
tuition in the college, academy or normal courses. 

Free Tuition— Subject to the following named conditions, free tui- 
tion for one year will be given to ore graduate from each high school 
or academy in this or adjoining states. Such student mast have ob- 
tained the highest rank in a class graduated not more than one year 
before application is made for this scholarship, and must be prepared 
to enter senior, preparatory, or freshman year. The president of the 
College would be glad to correspond with such students. 

Tuition in Special Departments —For a statement of the tuition 
charges in the Commercial, Musical and Art Departments, see the 
pages giving the account of those departments. 

Fractional Terms -Tuition in College, Academy, or Normal De- 
partments for a period of seven weeks or less will be at the rate of $1.25 
per week, provided that for a period of four weeks or less, the student 
will pay for four weeks. 

Refunds -Students paying tuition in advance for the year, if they 
leave school before the end of the year will a receive refund of any 
balance of their payment remaining after paying tuition at the rates 
stated above. 

ROOM, HEAT AND LIGHT 

Rooms —Young women may obtain rooms in the new Elizabeth R. 
Voorhees Dormitory. Most of these rooms are arranged to accommo- 
date two girls each, though there are a few desirable rooms with single 
beds to accommodate those who wish to room alone. Each room is 
furnished with a bed, mattress, wash-stand, crockery, dresser, study 
table and plain chairs. All other things desired are to be provided by 



Huron College, Huron, S. D. 17 

the students. Each occupant of a room in the dormitory shall. bring 
three sheets, one pair of pillow cases and one half dozen towels. These 
articles should be plainly marked with the owner's name. Rooms in 
the Voorhees Dormitory are heated by steam and lighted by electricity. 
For a statement of the fees for rent, heat and light, see the table of 
expenses given below Young women who desire to do so may obtain 
board and rooms in private families at a little more expense than in 
the dormitory. 

Young men may obtain rooms in the college building down town. 
Owing to the erection of the new Voorhees Dormitory, more rooms 
than heretofore will be available in the down town building for young 
men. Each of these rooms is furnished with a bed, mattress, wash- 
stand, bowl and pitcher, study table and plain chairs. All other 
things desired are to be furnished by the students. Bed linen and 
towels should be plainly marked with the owner's name. All rooms 
in the dormitory are heated by steam and lighted by electricity. Eor 
a statement of the fees for rent, heat and light, see the table of 
expenses given below. 

Reserving Rooms— Rooms in the Voorhees Dormitory will be re- 
served for incoming students only on advance payment of $5. Such 
payment will entitle the student to retain the room for four weeks 
after the opening of the term for which the payment is made. 

Rooms in the down town building will be reserved for young men 
only on advance payment of $5, which payment, when made, will 
entitle the student to retain the room four weeks after the opening 
day of the term for which it is made. 

These payments will apply on the regular term bills when the stu- 
dent registers. They will not be refunded in case the student fails to 
register unless the College receives notification of the surrender of the 
room by or before the opening day of the term for which the room is 
reserved. 

Heat, Light and Rent— Students rooming in the Voorhees Dor- 
mitory will pay for heat, light and rent a combined fee of $12 for the 
fall term, $13 for the winter term and $9 for the spring term If this 
fee is paid in advance for the year a reduction of $2 is allowed. 
Young men rooming in the down town building will pay a similar 
combined fee for heat, light and rent of $10 for the fall term, $11 for 
the winter term and $8 for the spring term, from which a reduction 
of $2 is allowed if payment is made in advance for the year. 

Room,;Meat and Light for Fractional Terms— Students rooming 



18 Huron College, Huron, S. D. 

in the Voorhees Dormitory for a period of seven weeks or less will pay 
for room, heat and light at the rate of $1.25 per week. Students 
rooming in this building for a period shorter than four .weeks will 
pay these fees for four weeks. Young men rooming in the down 
town building for a period of seven weeks or less will pay for room, 
heat and light at the rate of $1.10 per week. If young men occupy 
rooms in this building for a period shorter than four weeks, they will 
pay this fee for four weeks. 

MISCELLANEOUS FEES 

Incidental and Library Fee-All students in the College, Acad- 
emy and Normal departments will pay a combined incidental and li- 
brary fee of $2 per term. Students in school one-half term or less 
will pay this fee for one-half term. If they remain in school more 
than one-half term but less than a whole term, they will pay this fee 
for the whole term. 

Laboratory Fees— Breakage will be charged to laboratory stu- 
dents at a fair estimate of the value of the apparatus broken. In ad- 
dition, the following fees will be charged for the use of material and 
supplies for laboratory work: 
Chemistry $2.00 per term 

Biology l -™ 

Beginning Botany. &u 

Advanced Botany x 00 

Special Examinations -A fee of fifty cents will be charged for 
examinations given at times not regularly specified by the teacher or 
faculty. This does not apply to entrance examinations, which are 
free. Students missing the regular examinations because of sickness 
may, at the discretion of the teacher in charge, be excused from pay- 
ing the fee for the special examination. 

Late Attendance— A registration fee of $1 will be charged stu- 
dents who enroll after the opening day of either the winter or spring 
term, provided such students have been in attendance during the pre- 
ceding term. 

Diplomas— The fees for diplomas are as follows: 

For college degrees ®^ 

For musical department ^ 

For other departments ' 



Huron College, Huron, S. D. 19 

Table Board— A dining hall managed on the club plan is main- 
tained on the ground floor of the Voorhees Dormitory. The. large 
and pleasant dining room is capable of seating more than two hun- 
dred. Each student pays fifty cents per week for the cooking and 
serving of the meals. In addition to this he pays the cost of the food, 
the total, during the past seven years, having been kept at about $2. 
Young men rooming in the down town building or students rooming 
in town may obtainrd board at the club table if they so desire. 

Laundry— A laundry is managed on the ground floor of the Voor- 
hees Dormitory, at which students may have plain washing done at 
reasonable rates. From $8 to $12 per year should cover the cost of 
such necessary washing. 

Books— A supply of text books is handled in the down town 
building under the supervision of the faculty. From this supply, 
students may purchase text books at the usual retail price. If at the 
end of the term or the year the books are returned in good condition, 
the purchase price is refunded after deducting a moderate amount for 
rental. The cost of books may thus be reduced to a very small 
amount. 

SUMMARY OF EXPENSES 

FOR STUDENTS ROOMING IN THE VOORHEES DORMITORY 

Fall Winter Spring Advance Year's 

Term Term Term For Year Expenses 

Tuition, College, Academy, Normal $10.00 $10.00 $10. CO $25 00 

Incidentals and Library Fee 2.00 2 00 2 00 6 00 

Room Heat and Light 12.00 13.00 9.00 32.00 $63.00 

la ble board about $2.00 per week, 36 weeks 72 00 

Laundry, about uqo 

Books, from $5.00 to $10.00 7777. 7 7.77.77." 77.777 7 '.00 

Total $150.00 

FOR STUDENTS ROOMING IN THE DOWN TOWN BUILDING 

Fall Winter Spring Advance Year's 
Term Term Term For Year Expenses 

Tuition, Cellege, Academy, Normal $10.00 $10.00 $10.00 $25 00 

Incidentals and Library Fee 2.00 2.00 2 00 6 00 

Room, Heat and Light 10.00 11.00 8 00 27.00 $58 00 

Table board, about $2.00 per week, 36 weeks 72 00 

Laundry, about u'qq 

Books, from $5.00 to $10.00 .7.7.77 .7 .777 .7.7.' .'....' .7 ?'oo 

Total $145.00 

Note— Commercial and music students will substitute their 
respective rates of tuition in the above tables. 



20 Huron College, Huron, S. D. 



GENERAL REQUIREMENTS 

Only students with an earnest purpose are desired. For such, 
few regulations are necessary. 

Chapel— All students are expected to attend chapel exercises 
unless excused by the faculty. 

Church— On Sabbath all students are expected to attend at least 
one service at such church as they or their parents may select. 

Students not in the Dormitory -Students rooming in town are 
expected to conduct themselves in a self-respecting manner. Any 
lapse from such conduct will be dealt with by the faculty. 

Study Hours — All students are expected to observe such study 
hours as the faculty may announce. 

Residence Work— At least one term of work in residence shall be 
required of all students graduated from the College, Academy and 
Normal Courses. 

Regular Classification— All candidates for graduation shall be 
required to class without condition at the beginning of the spring 
term preceding graduation. 

Commencement Orations Commencement orations must be 
submitted to the president not less than six weeks before the date for 
commencement. 

Literary Societies -Students desiring to form a literary society 
are required to present to the faculty a petition to do so, and such 
petition must be signed by not fewer than fifteen students. 

Closing Meetings— Literary society meetings must be closed not 
later than 10 o'clock p. m. 

Credits— Credit for work required in any of the departments of 
this institution may be obtained in any of the three following ways: 
1. By transcription of the records from some approved school in 
which the work has already been done. 2. By a successful examina- 
tion in the subject. 3. By doing the work regularly with the classes 
as organized. 



Huron College, Huron, S. D. 21 

REQUIREMENTS FOR ADMISSION 

Academy— The completion of grammar grade work, including all the 

common branches. 
College For all courses. 
English— 

Advanced Grammar one year. 
Composition and Rhetoric, one year. 
English Literature, including American, one year. 
These requirements are intended to secure an amount of work 
equivalent to that covered by the preparatory courses in the Acad- 
emy. 

History and Civics — 

General History. 
American History. 
Civics, one-half year. 
Mathematics — 

Higher Arithmetic. 
Algebra, two years, 
Geometry, Plane and Solid. 
Science — 

Physiology. 
Physics, one year. 
For the Classical Course — In addition to the requirements for all 
courses. 
Latin — 

Grammar and Composition. 
Csesar, four books. 

Cicero, seven orations, including the four against Catiline. 
Greek — 

Grammar and Composition. 
Anabasis. 
Iliad, three books. 
For Latin=Scientific Course— In addition to the requirements for all 
courses. 

Latin— The same as in the Classical Course. 
German— Two years. 
For Scientific Course— In addition to the requirements for all 
courses. 
Latin — 

Grammar and Composition. 
Caesar, four books. 
German — Two years. 
French — One year. 
Science — 

Botany. 

Physical Geography. 



22 Huron College, Huron, S. D. 

Modern Language Course— In addition to the requirements for all 
courses. 

English— Word Study. 
German — Three years. 
French— One year. 
Scienoe— 

Zoology. 
Botany. 
Physical Geography. 

DEGREES 

Bachelor's Degree— The degree of Bachelor of Arts will be con- 
ferred upon graduates of the College who have completed the Clas- 
sical Course, and the Degree of Hachelor of Science will be conferred 
upon those who have completed other courses and have complied 
with all college requirements. 

/Master's Degree— The degree of Master of Arts or Master of Sci- 
ence will be conferred upon graduates of the College who have previ- 
ously obtained either of the two corresponding first degrees, and who, 
within three years of graduating, shall have completed an approved 
course of post-graduate study in this or some other institution of like 
rank. Such courses of study must require the equivalent of at least 
two years of eollege work. 

ACADEMY AND NORMAL DEPARTMENTS 

ACADEMY 

The Academy courses are planned with two objects in view: first, 
preparation for the corresponding courses in Huron College, or any oth- 
er standard college; secondly, the giving of a broad and practical edu- 
cation to students who cannot take a college course. The College 
authorities believe in the old-time classical education for those who 
can and are willing to take time for it. They therefore provide such 
a course. For others they provide a similar course which substitutes 
German for Greek. The Scientific Course requires two years of 
Latin, followed by German and French. The Modern Language 
Course omits Latin entirely, requiring still more German and French. 

NORMAL 

The Normal Course has been planned also with two objects in 
view: First, to comply with the state law, in order that students com- 
plying with the requirements of the law and receiving diplomas may 
be entitled to the state certificate; secondly, by the study of certain 
college subjects and association with college teachers and students to 
give a breadth of view and symetry of development not otherwise to 
be secured. 



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24 Huron College, Huron, S. D. 

EXPLANATION OF COURSES 

BIBLE STUDY 

1 First Year— Old Testament. The aim of this year's work is a 
thorough knowledge of Old Testament biography and leading histor- 
ical events. Required one hour a week throughout the rirst year of 
Academy and Normal Courses. Text- book The Bible; Stories from 
the Bible. 

2. Second Year -New Testament History. The life of Christ is 
especially emphasized in this course, continued one hour a week 
throughout the second year of the Academy and Normal Courses. 
Text book, MacLear's New Testament History. 

3. Third Year— Prophetic Period. The life, mission and messages 
of the Old Testament Prophets are studied in the third year of Acad- 
emy and Normal Courses, one hour a week throughout the year. 
Text book (a) The Bible; (b) The Messages of the Earlier Prophets. 

4. Fourth Year— Life of Paul. The aim is to gain a clear and 
comprehensive knowledge of the life and work of Paul. Kequired 
one hour a week throughout the year in the fourth year of Academy 
and Normal courses. Text- book, The Bible. 

ENGLISH 

For a general statement of the plan and purposes of the work in 
this department see the paragraph preceding the explanation of the 
College Courses in English 

5. First Year— The work will consist of a review of English 
Grammar, practice in composition and readings from English and 
American authors. Selections will be used from the works of Irving, 
Longfellow, Whittier, Webster, Hawthorne, Homer (in English), and 
Scott. 

6. Second Year— The work of the first year is continued. The 
more important principles of composition will be studied and applied 
in frequent composition Readings will be selected from Whittier, 
Holmes, Lowell, Addison, George Elliot, Arnold, Scott and Shake- 
speare. 

7 and 8. Third and Fourth Years- The classes are usually com- 
bined. The work of the preceding years is continued. The composi- 



Note— The readings in the Academy Courses include those usually required for 
college entrance examinations or their equivalents. 



Huron College, Huron, S. D. . 25 

tion work is of two sorts: many short compositions of two or three 
paragraphs are written, the pupils frequently criticising one another's 
work; two or three longer and more carefully developed papers are 
written each term. Composition is generally based upon the selected 
readings. Such works as the following are read: Macauley's "Mil- 
ton," Carlisle's "Burns," Milton's "Paradise Lost," Coleridge's "An- 
cient Mariner," Lowell's "Commemoration Ode" and Shakespeare's 
"As You Like It " A survey of English and American literary his- 
tory is made. 

9. Word Study — The aim is to study the derivation, history and 
use of words. 

HISTORY 

The aim of the history courses in the Academy and Normal depart- 
ments is to give a general view of the history of the world, including 
a careful view of the history of our own country and a study of gov- 
ernment The courses offered are as follows: 

10. Ancient History —This course includes readings in biography 
and mythology, followed by the history of Greece and Rome. 

11. Mediaeval and Modern History— Two terms of Mediaeval and 
Modern History will be required, followed by one term of American 
Colonial History 

12. United States History — This course is a half year's work in 
American History, beginning with the year 1783. 

i3. Civics— This course includes a study of local government as 
illustrated in township, city and county; of the state government of 
South Dakota, and of the constitution of the United States. Atten- 
tion is called to recent and current events illustrating the application 
of the subiect. 

LATIN 

i4. Grammar and Composition— Bennett's Foundations of Latin 
is studied for two terms; the third term is devoted to the study of 
Csesar, introductory to the regular work of the second year. Hark- 
ness' Complete Grammar is preferred. This work is required in the 
first year of the Classical and Scientific Courses. 

i5. Caesar— Four books of Csesar's Galic War are completed dur- 
ing the first and second terms. Sallust's Catiline completes the year's 
reading. One recitation each week will be given to Latin composi- 
tion and special drill in grammar. Required in the second year of 
Classical and Scientific Courses. 



26 Huron College, Huron, S. D. 

1 6. Cicero— Seven orations will be read, including the four against 
Catiline. Special attention is given to the style and the literary value 
of Cicero's orations. Selections from Ovid will also be read. Re- 
quired in the third year of the Classical Course. Students expecting 
to take thef; Latin-Scientific Course in the College will take this work. 

i7. Virgil— Six books of Virgil's JEneid, including Mythology, as 
introduced in the epic, will be studied. Required in the fourth year 
of the. Classical Course, preparatory to the Classical and Latin-Scien- 
title Courses in the College. 

GREEK 

18. Beginning Greek— First and second terms are devoted to the 
learning of inflections and the main rules of syntax. Easy exercises 
in reading will also be given. The Anabasis is read the third term 
with special attention to inflections and grammatical constructions. 
This course is required of third year students who are preparing for 
the Classical Course in the College. 

19. Second Year Greek— The Anabasis is continued with rapid 
review of the Grammar. In the second term the Illiad is commenced. 
Attention is given to Homeric forms and to scanning. In addition 
to the persistent effort to gain ease in translation and familiarity, 
with Greek inflections and constructions, the epic is studied as a liter- 
ary production. In conjunction with the study of the Iliad the 
"Myths of Greece and Rome" will be required as an additional study. 
Required of the fourth year academy students in the Classical Course. 

GERMAN 

20. First Year— a. Thomas' Practical German Grammar. Parti, 
b. Mueller and Wenckebach's Glueck Auf and easy texts. 

Pronunciation, the rudiments of grammar and the German script 
occupy this year, together with exercises in translation, and the 
memorizing of German dialogues and lyrics. This course is required 
of third year academy students in the Scientific Course, and second 
year students in the Modern Language Course. It is required also of 
third year students who are preparing for the Latin-Scientific Course 
in the College. 

21. Second Year— a. Stern, Geschichten vom Rhein, with com- 
position. 

b. Wildenbruch, Das Edle Rlut Hillern, Hoeher als die Kirche, 
Benedix, Der Prozess. 



Huron College, Huron, S. D. 27 

c. Schiller, Wilhelm Tell. 

Composition, both oral and written, is a special feature of this year's 
work. Kequired of students in the Scientific Course, in the fourth 
year of the Academy, and of those in the Modern Language Course 
in the third year. Fourth year students who are preparing for the 
Latin-Scientific Course in the College will elect this course instead of 
course 19. 

22. Third Year— See College Course No. 34, required of fourth 
year students in the Modern Language Course. 

MATHEMATICS 

23. Arithmetic— Required of first year Academy and Normal 
students, two terms, five recitations a week. 

24. Algebra 1— Required of second year Academy and Normal 
students, three terms, four recitations a week, work to extend to 
quadratic equations. 

25- Geometry— (Went worth's Plane.) Required third year, three 
terms, four recitations a week. 

26- Algebra 2— (Downey's Higher, Part I.) Required of fourth 
year Academy students, two terms, four recitations a week, and of 
third year Normal students one term. 

Geometry— (Went worth's Solid.) Required of fourth year Acad- 
emy students, one term, four recitations a week. 

SCIENCE 

27 Physiology— Blaisdell's Life and Health is the text book used. 
The class will constantly be shown microscopic sections of the tissues 
and organs studied, and some dissection will be done before the class. 
Required in the first year of the Academy and Normal Departments. 
Five recitations a week during the spring term. 

28- Zoology— Two terms, five hours a week. The course will be- 
gin with the simplist forms and will take up typical animals in order 
through the various groups to the higher vertebrates. Jordan's 
Animal Life will be used during the first term to give the students 
general ideas of life histories, problems of variation, adaptation and 
distribution of animals. In the second term laboratory work includ- 
ing dissections, careful drawings and descriptions will be taken up, 
supplemented by notes and recitations. Twelve compound micro- 
scopes are available for the use of the class, and many prepared sec- 
tions, besides illustrative material in the museum. 



28 



Huron College, Huron, S. D. 



29- Physical Geography— Required of third year Academy stud- 
ents in the Scientific and Modern Language Courses and of second 
year Normal students. Four recitations a week during the first half 
year. Davis' Elementary Physical Geography will be used. Jn addi- 
tion, a study of the weather by means of the daily weather reports, 
plotting of curves of temperature and pressure and familiarity with 
meteorological instruments, including the barometer, maximum and 
minimum thermometer and others will be required. 

30- Physics— Carhart and Chute's High School Physics is the text 
book used for elementary work. The laboratory will be equipped for 
some experimental work to accompany the text. Four hours a week 
throughout the year is required in the fourth year of the Academy 
and the third year of the Normal Department. 




****^w*^*"»: 



Cabinet B. The Improved Crowell Laboratory. 

The Crowell Laboratory shown in the cut has been purchased for 
use in the study of Physics. It contains a complete outfit for labor- 
atory work in this subject and will add greatly to the interest of 
classes in this department. 



Huron CoHege, Huron, S. D. 29 

3L Botany— The best opportunity is offered for a good elementary- 
course in this subject. During the winter months preparation is 
made for intelligent work on flowers by a study of stems, leaves, 
roots, germination of seeds, floral organs and other subjects. Recita- 
tions in Coulter or Bergen will be accompanied by laboratory work 
with the compound microscope on sections illustrating plant struct- 
ure. During the spring term, field work will be done in addition to 
laboratory work, the student making a herbarium of the plants of the 
region. Four times a week during the last half of the year. Re- 
quired of students in the third year of the Scientific and Modern 
Language Courses. 

32 Chemistry— In Chemistry we offer three courses, one in the 
Academy and two in the College Department. The Academic or 
Elementary Course covers the ground usually included in preparatory 
work. It is intended to give the student the first principles of the 
science and to prepare him for college work in the subject. This 
course will continue through one year. Remsen's Chemistry (briefer 
course) or William's Elements being used as a text book. Two reci- 
tations and two periods of two hours each in the laboratory will be 
required throughout the year. 

SPECIAL NORMAL COURSES 

Note:— During its last session, the Legislature made certain changes 
in the method of granting state certificates. Printed copies of the 
statute are not yet accessible, but it is understood that no change is 
made in the subject matter of the courses required. Our courses as 
explained below are subject to any change that may be necessary in 
order to conform to the requirements of the revised statute. 

33- Pedagogy I— Required of second year students, four hours a 
week through the second half of the year. 

(1) An introduction to the principles of Psychology upon which 
educational methods are based. 

(2) A study of the fundamental principles of the art of teaching. 

(3) General method and method as applied to the special subjects 
in the course of study. 

34 Pedagogy II— Required of third year students, three hours a 
week throughout the year. 

(1) School management, including school government, moral in- 
struction and the essential facts of the South Dakota school laws. 



30 Huron College, Huron, S. D. 

(2) History of Education. A rapid survey of Ancient and Me- 
diaeval Education and a more careful study of Modern Education, in 
eluding the school systems of Germany, France, England and the 
United States. 

(3) Psychology. Some good introductory text with special atten- 
tion to the application of psychological principles to educational 
problems. 

35. Pedagogy III. Required of fourth year students, three hours 
a week throughout the year. An extensive course of professional 
study and reading assigned with special reference to the needs of 
those taking the course. The guiding purpose is to give a wide 
knowledge of the best things in pedagogical literature and an ac- 
quaintance with modern educational ideals and methods of adminis- 
tration. 

36- Bookkeeping— Completion of this course gives the student 
sufficient knowledge of the subject to teach it in the public schools as 
required by the state law. Both the single and double entry systems 
are studied, and all the books used in ordinary business transactions 
are written. Required four hours a week of third year students dur- 
ing one term. 

37. Drawing — The principles of drawing are studied, a knowledge 
of perspective is obtained, and as much practice as time will admit is 
given. Free hand work is not attempted. The course is required of 
third year students four hours a week during one term. 

38. Biol gy— See college course No. 50. Required four hours a 
week in the fourth year. 

39- Trigonometry— See college course No. 40 b. Required of 
fourth year students four hours a week through the second and third 
terms. 

40- Astronomy— The development of astronomical knowledge is 
carefully traced, the laws of the science and the phenomena which 
they explain are studied as extensively as the time will allow. Re- 
quired of fourth year students four hours a week during the first term. 

41. Economics— See College Course No. 59. Required of fourth 
year students, four hours a week through half the year. 

42. Psychology— See College Course No. 55. Required of fourth 
year students, four hours a week through the first two terms. 



Huron College, Huron, S. D. 31 

43- Current Events— This course aims to give information with 
regard to present day affairs at home and abroad, and, at the same time, 
to give training in the proper methods of reading current periodicals. 
Special reports on topics assigned for investigation are occasionally 
required. One hour a week throughout the second year. 



32 Huron College, Huron, S. D. 



THE COLLEGE 

Four courses are offered in the College. The Classical Course fol- 
lows the old and well established lines. Students completing this 
course, including the Academy Course leading to it, are required by 
the end of their Sophomore year to have studied Greek four years, 
Latin and Mathematics six years each. As much English and His- 
tory as time will admit are added to these leading subjects in the 
Course. During the Junior and Senior years much liberty is given 
for elective work. Two years of German, some Psychology, Ethics 
and Economics are required. The object of this as well as the other 
courses is to secure, by required work during the earlier years of the 
course, a broad foundation and as much of culture as is possible. 
This being accomplished, the student is allowed, during the latter 
years of his course, to work more freely along the lines of his special 
ability or inclination. The Latin-Scientific Course is for students 
who wish a course in other respects like the Classical Course, but do 
not wish to study Greek. In this course German is substituted for 
Greek. . The Scientific Course requires but two years of preparatory 
Latin with a view to giving the student sufficient knowledge of the 
language to familiarize him with scientific terminology. German 
and French are required in this course as aids to scientific study. 
The Modern Language Course requires neither of the classical lan- 
guages. It emphasizes the culture studies; more of 'Modern Lan- 
guage and Literature being required than in the other courses. 



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34 Huron College, Huron, S. D. 

EXPLANATION OF COLLEGE COURSES 

BIBLE STUDY 

1- The ©ospels— The plan and purpose of each Gospel, and the 
part each has in presenting the life and work of Jesus is studied At- 
tention is given to the teachings of the Gospels as applicable to pres- 
ent day life, social and private. Required of Freshmen one hour a 
week throughout the year. Text-book: Gregory's Why Four Gos- 
pels. 

2. The Epistles— The authors, place and purpose of the New Tes- 
tament Epistles are considered Several of the Epistles are carefully 
analyzed and their teachings discussed, especially in their bearings on 
present day life. Required of Sophomores one hour a week through- 
out the year. Text- book: The Bible and The Apostolic Age. 

3- Apologetics This subject embraces a study of the authenticity 
of the Scriptures; arguments for the existence of God; theism and 
credibility of miracles, and the fundamental proofs for Christianity. 
Required of Juniors four times a week during the first semester* 
Text-book: Bowman's Historical Evidence of the New Testament 

4. Ethics— The principal ethical systems will be considered and 
compared with the Christian. Careful attention will be given to prac- 
tical ethics, applying the theory to individual, social and civic life. 
Required of Seniors four times a week for one term. 

ENGLISH 

The objects contemplated by the department of English are three: 
1. An acquaintance with literature; 2. Proficiency in composition; 
3. A knowledge of the history and development of the language and 
literature. 

In the Academy every one of the courses except Course 9 is directed 
to the attainment of all these objects. 

In the College an acquaintance with literature, its history and de- 
velopment and a genuine appreciation of literature are the objects of 
all the courses. Courses 6 and 7 give much attention to the history 
of the language. Course 5 is directed especially to proficiency in com- 
position. In Courses 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13 and 14 the other objects are 
particularly contemplated. 

Not all of these courses can be given in any one year. What 
courses can be given will be determined by the faculty in accordance 
with the demand. 



Huron College, Huron, S. D. 35 

5. Rhetoric and Composition— Lectures, recitations, daily themes 
and conferences. Besides the practice in composition considerable 
attention is given to the study of style by means of essays and 
speeches by Burke, Macaulay, Arnold and other writers. .Required of 
Freshmen four hours per week. 

ELECTIVES OPEN TO JUNIORS AND SENIORS 

6. Anglo-Saxon. 

7. Chaucer. 

8. Shakespeare and the Elizabethan Drama. 
9- English Literature of the 17th Century. 

10. English Literature of the 18th Century to the publication of 
the Lyrical Ballads, 1798. 

11 19th Century Poetry, with especial reference to Wordsworth 
and Shelley. 

12. Later 19th Century Poetry, with especial reference to Brown- 
ing and Tennyson. 

13. History of the English Novel. 

14. Literary btudy of the English Bible. This course consists 
chiefly of the study of the books of Job, Psalms and Isaiah. 

HISTORY 

In the College only one course in history is required, the aim of 
which is to give an account of the origin of the English people and 
their progress, political, social and intellectual, down to the Tudor 
period. The work is designed to introduce the student to modern his- 
torical methods; hence considerable stress will be laid upon investi- 
gation, note taking and theme writing. 

15. English History— Text-book and lectures, investigations and 
reports. Required of Sophomores, four hours per week. 

ELECTIVES OPEN TO JUNIORS AND SENIORS. 

16. English History from 1845 to 1789— Half course. 

17. European History from 1789 to the Present Time— Half 
course. 

18. Italian History— This course is chiefly a study of the Renais- 
sance. Half course. 



36 Huron College, Huron, S. D. 

LATIN 

19- Livy— Books XXI and XXII will be read, in connection with 
which there will be a general review of Roman History with special 
reference to the Punic Wars. Tacitus' Agricola, with a study of the 
history of the Empire follows. This course is required by Freshmen, 
in the Classical and the Latin-Scientific Courses, four hours per week. 

20 Horace - Selections' from the Odes, Epodes, Satires, and Epis- 
ties of Horace will be read, followed by selections from Catullus and 
other authors. Special attention will be given to the literary excel- 
lence of these authors. This course is required of Sophomores in the 
Classical and Latin-Scientific Courses. Four hours per week. 

21- Beginning Latin This course is the same as Course 14 in the 
Academy. It is offered as an elective to Sophomore students in the 
Modern Language Course. Four hours per week. 

22. Second Year Latin — This work is the same as that required in 
Academy Course 15. It is offered as an elective to Junior students in 
the Modern Language Course. 

JUNIOR AND SENIOR ELECTIVES. 

23. Roman Literature • This is a study of the early Latin writers 
to the decline of the empire, including also a survey of Roman Philos- 
ophy. The latter subject is studied chiefly from Cicero's writings. 
Selections from Flautus, also, are read. 

24. Seneca, Juvenal and the Latin Hymn Writers are studied in 
this course. 

25. Roman Law — A thorough study is made of the growth, codifi- 
cations and influence of the Roman law. The work is continued 
through one term. 

26- Roman Architecture— In this course the plan of the Roman 
house, the best known Roman buildings and the more important 
excavations will be studied during one term. 

GREEK 

27. Freshmen Greek — a. Plato— The Apology and Critio are read. 
Careful attention is given to the influence of Flato on philosophic 
thought. First term. 

6. Euripides— One of the plays of Euripides is read and attention 
is given to peculiarities of inflection and construction. The play is 
a.lso studied as a literary production. Second term. 



Huron College, Huron, S. D. 37 

c. Demosthenes— One or more of the shorter orations is read. 
The style is studied and the oration analyzed. Third term. Required 
of Freshmen students in the Classical Course. By the completion of 
these courses the student will gain an insight into some of the world's 
best literature, as embodied in the epic, the drama, the philosophical 
writings and the oratory of ancient Greece. 

28. Sophomore Greek— a. The Phaedo or Protagoras is read with 
attention to the thought presented. First term. 

b. Drama— The Antigone of Sophocies, or the Promethus Bound 
of Aeschylus is read. Careful attention is given to the development 
of the play and the literary merit of the Greek drama. Second term. 

c. Oratory — Demosthenes' De Corona will be studied with atten- 
tion to style and rhetorical development. Third term. Two terms 
may be given to Drama or to Oratory if a class so desires. 

STJNIOR AND SENIOR ELECTIVES 

29. Beginning Gr^ek— This course corresponds with Course 18 in 
the Academy. If, however, a sufficient number elect this work a 
special class will be formed, in order that the elements of Greek may 
be mastered in a shorter time than is usually allowed students in the 
Academy. Otherwise, the students taking this course will be in the 
same class with students taking the Academy Course 18. Open to 
Juniors. 

30. Second Year Greek— This work is the same as that offered 
in Course 19 in the Academy, except that additional work suited to 
more advanced students is done. This course is open to Seniors who 
have completed Course 18 in the Academy or Course 29 in the College. 

31. Hellenistic and Modern— This course will involve a study of 
N. T. Greek, the Greek of the Alexandrian period and Greek as a 
modern, living language. Text books: Westcott and Hort'sN.T., 
March's Eusebius, Stedman's Modern Greek Mastery. Three hours a 
week for one year. 

32. Greek Literature and Archaeology— In this Course Lawton's 
Greek Literature will be used as a basis for the study of Greek litera- 
ture, and Collingnon's (Wright's) Manual of Greek Archaeology for 
the study of Greek art and antiquities. Three hours a week for one 
year. 

33. Social Life Among the Greeks— This Course will involve a 
study of the manners, customs, folk-lore, home life and public life of 
the Greek people. 



38 Huron College, Huron, S. D. 

GERMAN 

34 Third Year German— The works of classic authors. Goethe's 
Hermann und Dorothea or Egmont. Schiller's Maria Stuart, and 
Lessing's Minna von Barnhelm are some of the texts that may be 
read. In this year special attention is given to German idioms, and 
to oral and written repioduction of portions of the texts read. Re- 
quired of Freshmen in the Latin-Scientific and Scientific Courses, and 
of fourth year Academy students in the Modern Language Course. 
Four hours per week. 

35 Fourth Year German— This Course includes the study of some 
works of modern authors, such as Fulda's Talisman and Sudermann's 
FrauSarge und Johannes* with outlines of the History of German 
Literature. This work is required of Freshmen in the Modern Lan- 
guage Course, and of Sophomores in the Latin Scientific Course. 
Three hours per week 

36- Beginning German— Elective for Sophomores in the Classical 
Course. Thomas' German Grammar, followed by some of the simpler 
texts. This course aims to give a somewhat extended vocabulary and 
familiarity with German sentence structure. 

37. Second Year German— This Course is meant to follow Course 
36. Lt may be either a study of the simpler classics or modern works, 
or a brief study of scientific German, as the needs of the class may 
determine. 

Advanced Elective Courses to follow Course 35 are also offered. 

FRENCH 

38- French I— Edgren's French Grammar. 

Halevy's L'abbe Constantin. 

Enault : Le chien du capitaine. 

Moliere : Le bourgeois gentilhomme. 

Scribe : Le verre d'eau. 

Selected prose works. 

Required of Freshmen in the Modern Language Course and Sopho- 
mores in the Scientific Course. Five hours per week.- 

39. French II — Study of the Grammar continued. 
Plays by Moliere, Corneille and Racine. 
Mme. de Stael's Corinne or other prose works. 

Required of Sophomores in the Modern Language Course and of 
Juniors in the Scientific Course. Three hours per week. 



Huron College, Huron, S. r D. 39 

MATHEMATICS 

40. (a) College Algebra One semester. 

(b) Plane Trigonometry— One semester. 

Course 40 is required of all Freshmen. Four hours per week. 

41. Plane Analytic Geometry— One semester. 

42. Differential Calculus -One semester. 

Courses 41 and 42 are required of Sophomores in the Scientific 
Course. They are also open, in the order given, as electives, to those 
having completed Course 40. Four hours per week. 

43- Integral Calculus— One semester. An elective open to those 
having completed Course 42. 

44. Theory of Equations— One semester. An elective open to 
those having completed Course 40. 

45 Solid Analytic Geometry— One semester. An elective open to 
those having completed Course 42. 

46- Curve Tracing— One semester. An elective open to those hav- 
ing completed Course 42. 

SCIENCE 

47- Chemistry- This Course is second year work and is offered to 
students who have previously had one year or its equivalent in the 
subject. The text book used for recitations and assignments will be 
Newth's Inorganic Chemistry. For laboratory work the instructor's 
own directions and notes in mimeographed form will be furnished at 
a nominal cost. A careful note book record of all work is kept by the 
student. References to the text throughout make this method super- 
ior to the use of any manual yet found. Required of Sophomores in 
the Scientific Course. Two recitations, and two laboratory periods of 
two and one-half hours each per week throughout the year. 

48. Qualitative Analysis— For students Who have had at least the 
equivalent of Course >2 in the Academy. It includes a study of the 
methods of detecting the principal bases and inorganic acids. Follow- 
ing this study, various unknowns will be analyzed either in solution 
or in acid form. Stress will be laid upon the uniting of the equations 
expressing the relations involved in the work and a careful record of 
everything done will be kept by each student. Noyes' Qualitative 
Analysis will be used for laboratory work and Newth for recitations* 
Elective for Juniors or Seniors. Two recitations and two after- 



40 Huron College, Huron, S. D. 

noons each week through the winter and spring terms will be 
required. 

49. Physics— This will be a more advanced Course than that 
offered to preparatory classes, special attention being given to Sound » 
Heat, Light, Magnetism and Electricity. Carhart's University Phys- 
ics will be used as a text book. Two recitation periods and two after- 
noons in the laboratory will be required through half the year of stu- 
dents in the Freshman year in the Scientific Course. 

50- Biology— Ooe term courses in Biology are deemed of little 
value, and, in order to give the student a comprehensive view of or- 
ganic life, this Course requires four hours of work through one year. 
The studies are chosen from Parker's Biology, which is used as a text- 
book. As many studies will be selected as can be well finished in the 
time assigned, ranging from Amoeba to Vertebrates and from Proto- 
coccus and Spirogyra to Angiosperms. The studies will be carefully 
selected in order to give a series which will bring to the student's at- 
tention related types of life from the lowest to the highest, each study 
being finished before another is taken up. Laboratory work with the 
compound microscope for four hours a week accompanies the text. 
Eequired of Juniors in the Scientific Course and of advanced Normal 
students. Elective for Sophomores in the Modern Language Course 
and for Juniors and Seniors in other courses. 

51. Advanced Botany— This will be an advanced Course in crypto- 
gramic Botany following -the same lines as Course 50 but limited to 
the great plant groups, algae, fungi, liverworts, mosses, ferns, gym- 
nosperms and angiosperms. Required one half year of Freshmen in 
the Scientific bourse. Elective for students in other courses who have 
had Course 31 in the Academy or Course 50 in the Academy or Course 
50 in the College. Recitations or lectures and laboratory work four 
hours per week. 

52. Geology— This is an elementary Course in Dynamical, Structu- 
ral and Historical Geology. Constant use is made of the large collec- 
tion of fossils and minerals in the museum. Brigham's Text Book of 
Geology will be used, followed by work in Mineralogy. A half year 
course, elective for Juniors and Seniors. 

53. Advanced Zoology— Bettger's Zoology will be used as a text 
book. The laboratory work indicated in the text will be required. 
This Course being elective for J.luniors and Seniors who have had 
Course 28 in the Academy, the work may be made to cover either two 



Huron College, Huron, S. D. 41 

terms or an entire year as the needs of the class may require. Micro- 
scopic work and dissection on the different animal groups will be done 
in addition to recitations and lectures. At least four hours a week 
will be required in the class room and laboratory. 

54. Advanced Physiology— This will be a two term Course plan- 
ned especially for teachers or those contemplating the study of medi- 
cine. The Histology of the tissues and organs will be taken up ex- 
haustively and laboratory work and dissection carried on. Rettger's 
Advanced Physiology, a recent and thorough book, will be used for 
recitations. This course is an elective for Juniors and Seniors who 
have had the requisite preparation. At least four hours per week 
will be required. 

PHILOSOPHY AND POLITICAL SCIENCE 

55- Psychology —This is an introductory Course, including a study 
of the main facts and laws of mental life. The Course is intended to 
give such knowledge of mental operations and laws as will be of 
value in practical life. It is required of Juniors and fourth year 
Normal students through the first and second terms, four hours a 
week. Text book: James' Elements of Psychology. 

56- Advanced Psychology— This Course seeks to elucidate the 
important subjects in the field of Psychology, including sensation, at- 
tention, time measurements and association. Seminary topics on the 
more important and interesting questions will be assigned to students. 
The development of mental processes in the child Js also considered. 
This course is elective, open through the first half of the year to Sen- 
iors who have completed Course 48. 

57. Philosophy— A history of Philosophy is completed in this 
course. The successive philosophical systems from Grecian to mod- 
ern times are studied and discussed in their development, mutual re- 
lations and bearings on the fundamental problems of life. Elective; 
open to Seniors through the second half of the year. 

58- Logic — The laws of thought are studied and practical applica- 
tions are made by students in the detection of logical fallacies and the 
formation and conversion of correct syllogisms. The aims and 
methods of correct thinking are set forth in this course. Required 
of Juniors through the third term, four hours a week. Text book: 
Jevon's & Hill's Elements. 

59- Economics— A studv of Q ome introductory text is followed by 
Ingram's History of Political Economics. Throughout the course, 



42 Huron College, Huron, S. D. 

readings are assigned from the works of Walker, Fladley, Mill, and oth- 
ers, for class reports; topics of present day interest receive attention. 
Required of Seniors, four hours a week through half the year. 



Huron College, Huron, S. D. 43 

SCHOOL OF MUSIC 

THE AIM OF THIS DEPARTMENT 

It is the aim of the Huron College School of Music to give the best 
possible musical education, which, based on the study of the classic 
masters, shall embrace whatever is good in modern art. The institu- 
tion endeavors to attain this end by well grounded instruction im- 
parted not only to those who wish to devote themselves to music as 
performers, but also to amateurs whose only object is to acquire a 
correct knowledge of music. 

TO PARENTS 

Parents sometimes desire that instruction in music be given to the 
pupil in his home. Such requests can not be granted partly because 
the time of the instructor will not admit of it and partly because this 
method is not deemed advisable. The study of music, to those who 
enter upon it, is as important as is the study of mathematics, litera- 
ture or the sciences, and it should be pursued in an equally systematic 
manner. .This is practically impossible under the old system of house 
to house instruction. The advantages of instruction in the Huron 
College School of Music are many. Such branches as harmony, com- 
position, sight singing, history of music and ensemble playing are 
taught. These subjects are absolutely essential to a thorough musical 
training. There are also lectures, recitals, concerts and a certain 
musical atmosphere, all of which are invaluable to the progress of the 
pupils. 

PIANOFORTE COURSE 

The work in pianoforte consists of three undergraduate courses: 
Elementary, Intermediate, and Advanced. A postgraduate course will 
also be offered. For graduation, the pupils will be required to com- 
plete satisfactorily the work through the Advanced Course and to 
pass examinations in harmony, history and theory. Students will be 
graduated in accordance with their ability and not in accordance with 
the number of terms of instruction they have taken. 

POSTGRADUATE COURSE 

The Postgraduate Course carries pupils on from the point reached 
in the Advanced Course. The more difficult works of Bach, Beeth- 
oven, Schumann, and others, including concertos will be studied. 
Counterpoint and analysis will be required. In order that students 



44 Huron College, Huron, S. D. 

may form a comprehensive idea of the literature of the pianoforte , 
they will be required to study a repertoire averaging five pieces each 
by the following composers: Bach, Handel or Scarlatti, Mozart, 
Haydn or Webber, Schumann or Mendelssohn, Chopin, Liszt, and of 
the modern composers, Brahms, Grieg, Tschaikowsky and Macdowell. 

OUTLINE OF COURSES 

The following outline will indicate the scope and difficulty of the 
work, but other studies and compositions may be substituted as the 
need of the pupils may require: 

ELEMENTARY COURSE. 

Kohler Method, Vol. I. 
Schmitt, Five-finger Exercises. 
Enkhausen, Czerny's or Bertini's little pieces. 
Gurlitt's, dementi's and Kuhlau's Sonatinas. 
Easy Sonatas of Haydn and Mozart. 
Hand culture, ear training and notation. 
Literature of the day. 

INTERMEDIATE COURSE— FIRST YEAR 

Technical exercises, legato and staccato studies, wrist exercises, 
embellishments. 
Bach's Inventions a duo Voci. 
Mason's Technics. 

Sonatas of Haydn, Mozart and Beethoven. 
Easy works of Mendelssohn, Schumann and Schubert. 
Literature of the day. 

INTERMEDIATE COURSE— SECOND YEAR 

All forms of technical exercises, scales, arpeggios, double thirds, 
octaves. 
Studies by Cramer, Czerny, Clementi 
Bach's Inventions a tre Voci. 
Scarlatti's Sonatas. 

Hummel, Mendelssohn, Moscheles, Heller, Field's Nocternes. 
Chopin's Waltzes and Marzurkas. 

Brassin, Mozart, Haydn and Beethoven Sonatas and Concertos. 
Literature of the day. 



Huron College, Huron, S. D. 45 

ADVANCED COURSE 

Studies by Clementi, Chopin, Henselt and Liszt. 
Bach's Well-tempered Clavicord. 
Schumann, Mendelssohn and Beethoven Concertos. 
Scarlatti, Weber, Thalberg, Liszt and Chopin. 
Literature of the day. 

PIPE ORGAN 

Requirements— Organ students must be able to play Piano well 
enough to be in the Intermediate Course, Grade B, as moderate skill 
and familiarity with the keyboard is necessary before pedal obligato 
playing can be begun. The course will include a description of all the 
principal stops in use in large organs, the study of registration 
through the medium of pieces suitable for use as Preludes and Post- 
ludes in church service, including the works of Bach and Mendelssohn, 
as well as modern works in free form. Pupils who only intend to fit 
themselves for church positions can obtain an Organist's Certificate. 
The following are the requirements to be met by candidates for the 
Organist's Certificate: 

1. The passing of a satisfactory examination in Harmony. 

2. Ability to play any church hymn at sight. 

3. Ability to modulate into any given key. 

4. Ability to play an accompaniment of the difficulty of Rossini's 
Stabat Mater. 

5. Ability to play pieces with separate pedal obligato of the diffi- 
culty of Lemaigre's March Solennelle. 

Graduation— For graduation the same theoretical requirements are 
demanded as of pianoforte students. Graduates must be able to 
play such works as Mendelssohn's Organ Sonatas, Bach's Toccata and 
Fugue in D minor, Guilmant's March funebre and chant seraphique, 
etc. An organ recital is required of each pupil before graduation. 

VOICE 

The vocal course will consist of voice training and correct enuncia- 
tion. The voice training will include instruction in the principles of 
correct breathing (as applied to tone production, which will be con- 
tinued throughout the course, according to the needs of students) and 
tone production according to the Italian method, which is now recog- 
nized by all eminent teachers as producing the best results. In sing- 
ingjjrerman, French or Italian songs the proper pronunciation of those 



46 Huron College, Huron, S. D. 

languages will be taught. The music will be selected with special re- 
gard to the requirements of each pupil. 

Harmony— The course in harmony will cover one school year and 
will be taught in classes, twice weekly. Emery's Harmony will be 
used as text-book. This course will be required of students in Piano, 
Organ or Voice, but no extra tuition will be paid by such students. 

Counterpoint, Theory and Musical Form— These subjects will be 
taught twice weekly during the winter and spring terms. Bridge's 
Simple Counterpoint will be used. No text book will be required^for 
Theory and Form. 

Musical History— Bonavia Hunt's History of Music will be found 
a most useful and handy book of reference for students taking this 
course. Instruction will be given principally in lectures upon which 
the students are expected to take notes. The lectures will be based 
on the Histories of Music by Rowbotham, Naumann, Hullah, Dr. 
Riemann, Dr. Nohl, Dr. Langhans, Grove's Dictionary of Music and 
Musicians, etc., and the course will be a very comprehensive one, 
covering the history of music from the most ancient times to the pres- 
ent. Two periods weekly will be required during the entire school 
year. 

Terms and Periods— Lessons in the Musical Department will be 
given by the term, the terms in this Department being identical with 
those of the other departments, namely, the fall, winter and spring 
terms, respectively thirteen, twelve and eleven weeks in duration. 
Private lessons of thirty m unites each will be given in the Piano, 
Organ and Voice Class lessons in Harmony, Musical History and 
Counterpoint will be forty -five minutes each. 

TUITIONS AND OTHER ITEMS 

Fall Winter Spring 

Piano, Organ, Voice, two lessons per week $19.50 $18.00 $16.50 

Piano, Organ, Voice, one lesson per week 10.00 9.50 8.00 

Piano for practice, one hour per day 3.25 3.00 2.75 

Piano for practice, two hours per day 5.20 4.80 4.40 

Piano for practice additional hours at a reduced rate. 

Harmony, two lessons per week 6.00 6.00 5.00 

Musical History, two lessons per week 6.00 6.00 5.00 

Counterpoint, Theory and Musical Foi m, two lessons per week, 

winter and spring terms 6.00 5.00 

Piano, Organ or Voice, single lessons, each 1 .25 

Diploma at graduation 3.00 

Organist's Certificate 2.00 



Huron College, Huron, S. D. 47 

Advance Payments— A discount of ten per cent, will be allowed 
upon payments made in advance for the entire year. 

Fractional Terms— Students compelled to leave school on account 
of sickness or for other reasons, and those taking but a few lessons 
will pay tuition at the following rates: 

Seven or fewer consecutive lessons, each $1 . 25 

Eight or more consecutive lessons the full term fee. 

Omitted Lessons— No allowance will be made for omitted lessons 
except in case of protracted illness, in which case due notice must be 
given to the teacher, who will then no longer reserve the pupil's time. 
A new hour will be assigned when the pupil resumes the lessons. In 
case of indisposition, or, if for other good reasons the pupil is unable 
to take the lesson, the teacher may arrange to give the lesson at some 
other time. 



48 Huron College, Huron, S. D. 

HURON BUSINESS COLLEGE 

G. M. LYNCH, Principal, 

BUSINESS COURSE 

1. Bookk eping— Bookkeeping and Business Practice consists of 
three departments: Introductory, Actual Business Practice, and 
(Mice Department. 

The student is thoroughly instructed in regard to the principles of 
double and single entry Bookkeeping, including the handling of com- 
mercial paper, all transactions being recorded from vouchers received 
or issued. Each student assumes the position of bookkeeper and de- 
pends upon himself for advancement, as the instruction is individual. 
Special ruled books are used, and adapted to different lines of bus- 
iness and such an extensive variety of transactions introduced as to 
familiarize the student with all the phases of business with which he 
may come in contact. 

The system of checking is such that any error in outgoing papers 
or in any record can be detected at once by the teacher in charge. 

2 Actual Business Practice— Students having passed the required 
examinations in the preceding departments are admitted into the 
Business Practice Department, and engage in the wholesale and com- 
mission business upon their own responsibility, using borrowed cap- 
ital. Merchandise is bought and sold subject to Chicago quotations, 
which are placed upon the bulletin board. 

Intercommunication— Each student is provided with a directory of 
at least twenty-four business firms representing different lines of busi- 
ness. About twelve of these are firms of other schools belonging to 
the Business Practice Association. Thus the students of this school 
are corresponding with students in all parts of the United States. 
Goods are bought and sold, being represented by a system of cards, 
and all negotiations are carried on through the mails. Invoices, 
order, drafts, bills of lading, account sales, notes, receipts, mortgages, 
deeds, leases, and other commercial papers are exchanged as in the 
usual course of actual business. 

3. Office Department— In order to make the system complete, 
offices have been equipped for the purpose of representing Banking, 
Wholesale Merchandise, Railroading, Commission, Real Estate, Fire 
Insurance and Commercial Exchange. Advanced students are placed 
in charge and are held responsible for business transacted with them. 



Huron College, Huron, S. D. 49 

Each manager of an office is required to submit a weekly report, and 
at the expiration of required time, all business affairs being satisfac- 
torily attended to the student is promoted. 

College currency, merchandise cards, and all books, blanks, stamps, 
letter press and necessary equipment, such as is required in the mod- 
ern business office, is furnished in order to familiarize the student 
with every detail. 

4. Commercial Law— Ignorance of the law excuses no man. It is 
our purpose to impart to our students a thorough knowledge of the 
principles of the common and statute laws pertaining to everyday 
business transactions. Our students are thoroughly familiarized with 
their liabilities and rights in their business intercourse in the Business 
Practice Department. 

This subject includes the law of contracts, negotiable and non- 
negotiable instruments, agency, partnership, corporations, mortgages, 
deeds, insurance, real estate, etc., and is taught by means of class 
drills in which a text-book is used. The student's knowledge of each 
chapter is tested by being given cases on which he is required to give 
an opinion regarding the rights of parties involved. 

In order to give our students the best possible instruction in this 
subject, we have, at considerable expense, secured the services of a 
well known attorney of this city, who will deliver a lecture each week 
on the subject assigned for study and recitation during the previous 
week. He has had considerable experience as a lecturer in law, and 
was for some time instructor in the Law of Real Property and Com- 
mercial Paper in the Illinois College of Law in Chicago, and with a 
large experience as a practicing attorney, he is thoroughly qualified to 
teach this important branch, of business education. 

5. Arithmetic— This branch of mathematics, as a means of mental 
discipline, is invaluable in the development of the judgment and the 
reasoning faculties. Our students are instructed daily in the every 
day problems that occur for daily solution in the store, office, shop or 
on the farm. The best short methods used in different lines of busi- 
ness receive careful attention. 

A practical text-book has been adopted, which is supplemented by 
other texts and practical problems given by the teacher of this branch. 

6. Rapid Calculation— All students are required to join the class 
in rapid calculation, which recites daily. Accuracy and rapidity are 
essential to every business man, especially to a young man or woman 
entering upon a business career as an accountant or stenographer. 



50 Huron College, Huron, S. D. 

Our students are drilled daily in mental arithmetic, rapid methods of 
addition, multiplication, division, computation ot interest and dis- 
counts, in fact, in all ordinary calculations. 
This affords a splendid review for members of the arithmetic class. 

7. Correspondence— A large proportion of the business of to-day 
is transacted by mail, hence the importance of skillful letter writing. 
Composition, punctuation, spelling, penmanship and form are given 
proper attention. Students of this class are required to write letters 
representing different lines of business, which are carefully corrected 
and returned by the teacher in charge. This also includes the writing 
of advertisements and the publicity of business in general. 

8. Spelling— Very few students are able to pass an entrance exam- 
ination in this subject. The ability to spell without hesitation is es- 
sential to the amanuensis or oflice employe. Our students must en- 
roll as members of the spelling class until able to pass a rigid test. 

Students are required to pronounce accurately, and to write and de- 
fine at least twenty- five words chosen from a list of one hundred as- 
signed for study. An old fashioned spelling match each Friday has 
done much to stimulate interest and will be continued. 

9- Grammar — The fall term will be devoted to a review of English 
Grammar, with practice in correct writing, and the study of words 
and composition will be required in the spring term. It is our pur- 
pose to give to our students a symmetrical training, and we believe 
that ability to use language which expresses clearly the thought of 
the writer or speaker is essential to the success of every young person 
who engages in business. 

The importance of correct expression in business is recognized by 
business men. It is said that Marshall Field & Co. pay $1 to any em- 
ploye who will find an error in English in any of their literature or 
correspondence. 

10. Penmanship— Good penmanship is essential to any young per- 
son intending to enter upon a business career A well written letter 
of application, correct in composition and spelling, will attract the at- 
tention of an employer and secure a much desired interview, while a 
slovenly written, badly composed letter would be thrown into the 
waste basket. 

We teach our students to write an easy, rapid and legible style such 
as can best be adapted to business. 

This is taught by means of blackboard exercises and drills in daily 



Huron College, Huron, S. D. 51 

exercises of forty minutes each, and each student is required to hand 
at least two pages of the preceding day's copy to the teacher in charge, 
students are furnished with the best penmanship publications and 
every possible means used to encourage persistent, painstaking prac- 
tice. With very few exceptions our students learn to write a splendid 
business style. 

11. Shorthand— Shorthand is the key with which many young men 
have opened the door to success in professional, financial and political 
life. It is a pleasant and profitable profession, and one who is com- 
petent has the assurance of steady employment, as there is an increas- 
ing demand for stenographic help. 

Students should have the equivalent of a high school or academic 
education before beginning the study of Shorthand, as the duties of a 
stenographer require a knowledge of affairs, and, especially, thorough 
familiarity with the use of the English language. Many students 
who are deficient in this respect are able to remedy the defect by join- 
ing classes organized for this purpose and by a well directed course of 
reading. 

A young person contemplating beginning a business career in a 
clerical capacity should by all means become proficient as an account- 
ant, as well as a stenographer, owing to the fact that many business 
men require such clerical assistance and are willing to pay a propor- 
tionate salary. 

We use the standard universal system, Pitman's Phonography, as 
arranged by Isaac S. Dement, of Chicago, 111. The elements of pho- 
nography are taught during the fall and winter term, and dictation 
and transcript of legal papers in the spring term. 

12. Typewriting— Shorthand and typewriting go hand in hand. 
The usefulness of one without the other is impaired to a considerable 
extent. 

We teach our students to use the touch system, using a text con- 
taining graded lessons in which students are taught correct fingering 
from the very start. After having finished the introductory work, 
the student is required to copy forms of business, etc., preparatory 
to taking the same from dictation for transcription. 

Students are familiarized with all copying and duplicating devices in 
use, and other details of office work. Neat, accurate work is rigidly 
insisted upon, a certain degree of rapidity being required. 

We use the Remington and Smith- Premier machines, a sufficient 



52 Huron Col 1 ege, Huron, S. D. 

number being provided in order to permit students to devote as much 
time to practice as other studies may permit. 

13- English Department— This department has been recently or- 
ganized for the benefit of those who have been out of school for some 
time and wish to review the common branches before beginning in 
either the Business or Shorthand course. Also those who are prepar- 
ing for civil service examination, teaching, or for any reason desire to 
secure a better knowledge of the common branches. 

COURSE OF STUDY 

Credits 

Arithmetic 10 

Grammar 10 

Rhetoric.-. 10 

Correspondence 

Geography 10 

Civics * 10 

U.S. History 10 

Spelling- 

Penmanship 10 

Physiology 

Reading 5 

Ninety credits are allowed for above subjects, necessary for com- 
pletion of the course. The remaining ten credits are elective from] 
the following subjects: 

Commercial Law 10 

Economics 10 

General History 10 

Algebra MJ 

EXPENSE 

Fall Winter Spring Adv. Year's | 
Term Term Term for yr Exp. 

Tuition, Business or Shorthand courses $17.00 $17.00 $15 00 $49. (JO: 

Tuition, English Department 12.00 12.00 12.00 30.00 

Room, Heat and Light, young men in college bldg 10.00 11.00 8.00 27.00 27.00 

Table board, about $2.00 per week, 36 weeks $ 72.001 

Laundry, about 8.00 

Books for Business Course, $10.00 ir.,00 

Stamps and stationery in office practice, $1.00 1.0C| 

Books for Shorthand Course, $3.50. 

Diploma at graduation 3.00 

Total - $170.00 

Tuition, stationery and dormitory expenses are required to be paid 
in advance. 



Huron College, Huron, S. D. 53 

The incidentals and library fqes are included in the tuition fee as 
stated above. 

Young ladies rooming in the Voorhees Dormitory will add $5 for 
room, heat and light. 

Tuition for a shorter period than one-half term, per week, $1.50. 

Students who prefer may pay the entire bill ($170.00) at the begin- 
ning of the school year, for which we will issue an itemized receipt. 
Time will be extended for good reasons. 

We invite a careful comparison with the expense bill3 of other 
schools. 



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Huron College, Huron, S. D. 55 

ART DEPARTMENT 

The object of this department is to offer such instruction as may be 
desired by special students in Art and to provide for students in the 
Normal department as thorough and practical a course in Drawing 
as the limited time allowed for the study of this subject will permit. 

Exhibit— Early in December, an excellent exhibition of the work of 
students was held in the pleasant room used for this work on the first 
Moor of the college building. Water colors, oils and various articles 
in burnt and carved wood and leather were displayed. During the 
two days the room was kept open, it was visited by about four hun- 
dred people. Another public exhibit of the work done by pupils will 
be held at the end of the school year. 

GENERAL ART COURSE 

First Year Line and shadow drawing in charcoal, pencil and mon- 
ochrome from blocks, ornaments, still life and casts. 
Design from geometric and natural forms. 
Perspective. 
Sketching from nature. 
Art history. 

Second Year— Advanced drawing from casts, pen and ink drawing 
from objects, still life in colors. 

Design from historic ornament, wall paper, book covers. 

Geometric drawing. 

Sketching from life. 

Art history; picture study. 

Special Classes— Classes will be formed for those who do not care 
to take up the regular work, but wish lessons in oil, water colors, py- 
rography or wood carving. Lessons in china painting will be given 
one afternoon during each week. 

Tuition— All tuitions must be paid at the beginning of the term for 
which the lessons are desired. Students are not received for less than 
one term. No deduction is made for lessons which are missed except 
in case of serious and long continued illness. Tardiness at lessons 
will be at the loss of the student. The fees will be as follows: 

In regular art course, three lessons per week, per term $18.00 

In special art course, one lesson per week, per term 6.00 

China painting, one three hour lesson 75 



56 Huron College, Huron, S. D. 

PRIZES AWARDED, 1904-5 

The F. H. Kent prize in Oratory, Charles R. Hatch. Subject of 
Oration, "The Voice of the Slav." 

The Thomas Maynard prize in Declamation, first, George VV. Cross- 
man; second, May Pyle. 

The Robert C. Gibbs prize for the highest standing in the College, 
Academy or Normal departments, Bess Jean Parks. 

UNDERGRADUATE DEGREES CONFERRED AT COM- 
MENCEMENT, 1905 

Bachelor of Arts Bess J ean Parks, Sioux Falls 

Bachelor of Arts Frank Junek, Eagle 



Huron College, Huron, S. D. 57 



LIST OF STUDENTS 

The numbers refer to the bound volume of the registrations. 

COLLEGE 

SENIORS 

171 Junek, Frank Eagle 

125 Parks, Bess Jean Sioux Falls 

JUNIORS 

119 Miller, Charles R Huron 

127 Parks, Theodora W Sioux Falls 

151 Van Ruschen, Edward Marion 

SOPHOMORES 

83 Cottin, Emma M , Huron 

184 Hatch, Charles R - . . .Alpena 

FRESHMEN 

78 Blake, Ambrose Huron 

79 Blake, George B Huron 

180 Dobson, John Huron 

103 Hill, Robert B Huron 

199 Leech, Lois Beresford 

117 Matousek, Cora Eagle 

177 McLaurin, Archie Hazel 

178 Mouser, Carl B Huron 

128 Pasek, Anna Mae Academy 

252 Rif enbark, Roy D Huron 

134 Roberts, Frank Pierpont 

138 Searle, Benjamin C Sioux Falls 

140 Smith, Alfred C Huron 

SPECIAL STUDENTS 

179 Dobson, James M Huron 

223 Foster, J, P Huron 

292 Moore, George H Yankton 

195 Van Voorhis, Samuel Hitchcock 



58 Huron College, Huron, S. D. 

ACADEMY 

FOURTH YEAR 

163 Appel, Montefiore Huron 

80 Brown, George M " . .' Wolsey 

85 Cook, Earl D — Gettysburg 

129 Pasek, James C , . .. Academy 

168 Pyle, John S Huron 

142 Starring, Cecil C Huron 

159 Wood, Welcome W Huron 

89 Crawford. Miriam Huron 

THIRD YEAR 

165 Cross, Anna Arlington 

104 Hixson, Louisa . Wessington 

105 11 ixson, Sarah Wessington 

109 Jenks, Beulah . Wessington 

130 Perkins, Gladys White 

286 Stewart, Clarence Huron 

153 Walder, Hans .....Hayti 

155 Willis, Effie A Wolsey 

SECOND YEAR 

251 Andrews, William O Huron 

183 Finch, Neal A Huron 

97 Gerberich Cora E Langford 

98 Gilbert, Hattie R Langford 

110 Johnson, Chas. H Hetland 

162 Markey, Mae M Huron 

132 Pyle, May Huron 

133 Pyle, Nellie Huron 

135 Sargent, Alma L Belle 

141 Snyder, Edna B Wolsey 

146 Sutter, Lewis F Hitchcock 

firs 7 yi;ar 

74 Anderson, James B Huron 

250 Andrews, Myron Huron 

75 Arnold, Laura E Evarts 

84 Cogan, Clair Huron 

196 Craig, William Garden City, Mo 

167 Diehl, Doris S Scotland 



Huron College, Huron, 8. D. 59 

217 Elder, James K Cavour 

99 Giles, Earl L Cavour 

102 Hebron, Glen Virgil 

208 Lyon, Will Huron 

114 Madison. Gladys Manchester 

120 Miner, Grace M Huron 

124 Owen, Elmer G Langf ord 

126 Parks, Kent A Sioux Falls 

131 Prose, Herman Wolsey 

197 Pyle, Gladys Huron 

139 Small, Gale Winthrop 

192 Stalker, Harry B Canistota 

150 Van Arsdale, Stella Carrollton, 111 

152 Walder, Alex Hayti 

156 Wilson, Edith Huron 

NORMAL 

FOURTH YEAR 

90 Crossman, George W Wessington 

THIRD YEAR 

253 Andrews, Ethel E Huron 

289 Boughton, Winifred Huron 

280 Burrows, Grace L Chicago, 111. 

288 Corley , Marie Huron 

91 Crossman, Hortense F Wessington 

193 Demaree, Lina C Huron 

169 Doyle, Katherine G Huron 

121 McDonnell, Lillian E Huron 

242 Peet, Gail H Virgil 

198 Wellington, Nina Wolsey 

158 Wood, Olive E Huron 

SECOND YEAR 

182 Adams, Franc Huron 

170 Brandmire, Florence Huron 

100 Goddard, Nellie Altamont 

116 Martin, Grace J Wessington 

136 Sargent, Carrie Belle 

185 Udell, Lucile , Pierpont 

157 Wilson, Eva M Pierpont 



60 Huron College, Huron, S. D. 

FIRST YEAR 

245 Alley, Julia H Farnsworth, 

264 Carey, Pearle E. Blunt 

77 Berry, Lola D Ree Heights 

92 Curtis, Julia L Cavour 

95 Freeburg, Lillie La Delle 

279 Gellhaus, Mary £ Crandon 

108 Hoover, Lillian H uron 

248 Johnson, Helen M Huron 

113 Klumph, Mabel Louise Huron 

206 Lyon, Nellie Alpena 

115 Madsen, Johanna M Carpenter 

244 Kay, Luella G Farnsworth 

137 Scotchbrook, Frances Wessington 

258 Stove, Ella Howard 

149 Van Arsdale, Bertha Carrollton, 111. 

MUSIC 

PIANO, VOICE AND PIPE ORGAN 

74 Anderson, James B Huron 

226 Axness, Ida M Willow Lakes 

291 Barnes, Marguerite Huron 

76 Barrows, Geo. C Huron 

79 Blake, Geo H uron 

174 Christianson, Jessie Hazel 

228 Connors, Alice Huron 

269 Cooper, Genevieve Huron 

86 Cooper, Grace W Huron 

268 Corley, Grace L Huron 

88 Cotton, Grace E Huron 

165 Cross, Anna Arlington 

273 Davis, Marie Huron 

167 Diehl, Doris Scotland 

290 Faber, Blanche Woonsocket 

211 Fuller, Laura Cavour 

97 Gerberich, Cora E. Langf ord 

98 Gilbert. Hattie R.. Langford 

99 Giles, Earl L Cavour 

272 Harmon, Vere Huron 



Huron College, Huron, S. D. 61 

274 Hunter, Pearl : Alpena 

109 Jenks, BeuJah Wessington 

249 Johnson, Jennie Langford 

171 Junek, Frank Eagle 

203 Longstaff, Lillian Huron 

208 Lyon, Will '. . Huron 

230 Mc Vay, Gail St. Lawrence 

120 Miner, Grace Huron 

287 Notestein, James Huron 

261 Noyes, Estella Ree Heights 

130 Perkins, Gladys -. White 

137 Scotchbrook, Frances Wessington 

140 Smith, Alfred C Huron 

229 Smith, Mamie H Huron 

227 Spargue, Mrs GiJmore, Iowa 

278 Tolmie, Lena Huron 

173 Trumm, Effie. Hayti 

153 W alder, Hans , Hayti 

234 Weingartner, Anna Huron 

209 Wilson, Lucile Huron 

VIOLIN AND MANDOLIN 

164 Angus, W. R Canistota 

191 Brandmire, Paul Huron 

216 Cogswell, Mark E Huron 

190 Corley, Abbey .Huron 

188 Davis, Martha Huron 

176 Dunn, W.R Huron 

187 Flemming, Bessie Huron 

194 Gabel, Margaret Ca vour 

215 Keim, C. J Huron 

175 Knutson, Nels Swift Falls, Minn. 

210 McClu re, Nellie Huron 

224 Rittner, G. W Huron 

186 Smith, Howard Huron 

152 Walder, Alex Hayti 

ART 

204 Breen, Josie Huron 

174 Christianson, Jessie Hazel 

282 Coonrod, Alice Huron 

188 Davis, Martha , Huron 



62 Huron College, Huron, S. D. 

255 Fleming, Kate Huron 

218 Godfrey, Winnif red Huron 

274 Hunter, Pearl Alpena 

203 Longstaff, Lillian Huron 

232 Marsh, Mayme A Cavour 

219 McMahon, Florence : Huron 

201 Mills, Jessie A Huron 

202 McGarvey. Florence I Huron 

256 Myer, Emma Huron 

229 Smith, Mamie H Huron 

254 Smith, J. W , Huron 

281 Thompson, Mildred Huron 

257 Van Winkle, Sarah Huron 

205 Walker, Effie. Huron 

221 Wardall, Janet Huron 

COMMERCIAL 

73 Anderson, Ida C ' Bancroft 

237 Appleman, Archie Huron 

76 Barrows, Geo. C H uron 

238 liatchelder, A. E Huron 

247 Berry, Jay J Ree Heights 

212 Boos, Fred H uron 

241 Burrows, Milf ord D v , Huron 

81 Carpenter, Roy F Goshen 

87 Costain, Ernest Parker 

263 Cotton, N.J Huron 

267 Camp, Harry Ree Heights 

183 Finch, Neil A Huron 

222 Flyinghalk, David Greenwood 

77 Fricke, Henry G Gettysburg 

275 Gidden, Ernest Hitchcock 

214 Goodell, Leon S Huron 

235 Halk, Pattie Huron 

271 Hauzer, John Lake Andes 

101 Hebron, Forest B Virgil 

107 Holton, Jessie S Huron 

276 Hodge, Hazel Huron 

111 Johnson, Fred A Huron 

249 Johnson, Jennie Langf ord 

172 Juran, Chas Wagner 



Huron College, Huron, S. D. 63 

277 Lundblad, Carl Huron 

284 Langlan, John Huron 

259 Nelson, David Miller 

122 Nelson, Louis Miller 

161 Parke, H. Helen Huron 

134 Roberts, Frank Pierpont 

240 Sedam, Ralph , . . .Wessington 

239 Smith, Fred Broadland 

192 Stalker, Harry B Canastota 

283 Stewart, Ella , Huron 

262 St. Pierre, Earl Greenwood 

246 Teller, Frank S... Miller 

147 Thomas, Cecil Huron 

207 Tollefson, A. 1 Verdon 

X54 Waldron, Harry Lakeside 

534 Weingartner, Anna Huron 

160 Wicke, Ernest W Bridgewater 

243 Wilson, Leo T Huron 

SHORTHAND COURSE 

164 Angus, W. R Canistota 

275 Bonesteel, Iva Pierre 

82 Claymore, John Greenwood 

93 Danielson, Olga Lead 

94 Daum, Katherine Huron 

181 Fuller, Mabel F Huron 

225 Hare, DeWitt Andrus 

106 Hoenhouse, Lizzie M Huron 

112 Key, John Huron 

231 LeOlair, Peter. Jolley 

270 Matteson, C. E Huron 

260 McNeil, J. I ...Bailey 

118 Meharg, Max Yerdon 

218 Mills, Hattie Huron 

233 Mills, May. Huron 

178 Mouser, Carl Huron 

236 Samuelson, Celia Pierre 

143 Starring, Geo. A Huron 

145 Stew T art, Chester E Huron 

144 Stevens, T. R Castlewood 



61 Huron College, Huron, S. D. 

285 Taliedge. Julia Huron 

148 Tobin, Florence H Huron 

220 Tollef son, Thomas C Verdon 

266 Washburn, Cromwell Huron 

SUMMER SCHOOL, 1904 

1 Anderson, Andrea Bryant 

2 Anderson, Ida Bancroft 

3 Allen, L. M Hitchcock 

4 Baldwin, M. Margaret Wessington 

5 Ball, Zella Virgil 

6 Barber, Ethel M. Esmond 

7 Brandmire, Ada V Huron 

8 Brandmire, Florence Huron 

9 Camp, Mae Bee Heights 

10 Caverhill, Mabel Estelline 

11 Chism, Imo C : Huron 

12 Churton, Edith La Lelle 

13 Conners, Harriet E Wolsey 

14 Cook, Charley W Huron 

15 Corley, Grace L Huron 

16 Cow r an, Nora H arrold 

17 Cramer, Ollie Hitchcock 

18 Doyle, Katherine G Huron 

19 Elder, Belle ; '. Huron 

, 20 Esterberg, Teckla Broadland 

21 Farley, Jane E ". Beresford 

22 Gilbert, Mabel Huron 

23 Goddard, Nellie Altamont 

24 Harold, Wilda Esmond 

25 Havens, Lucy Cornell 

26 Hoy, Alva N La Delle 

27 Hoard, Achsah L Howard 

28 Hutchins, Ruth A Cornell 

29 Humphrey, Lizzie A Howard 

30 Kester, Jessie Huron 

31 Kintigh, Jessie Dean 

32 Knox, Gracia Clark 

33 Kohlmeyer, Anna Wolsey 



Huron Co'lege, Huron, S. D. 65 

34 Lapham, Carrie Iroquois 

35 Livingstone, Jessie L Onida 

36 Luckey, Edna E Alpena 

37 Mahoney, Ellen Howard 

38 Mahoney, Margaret Howard 

39 Maley, Fern Vilas 

40 Maley, Viola Vilas 

41 Martin, Mary Cavour 

42 Monroe, Nellie Howard 

43 Murphy, Florence *. Miller 

44 Murphy, Mae Brookings 

45 MacNerney, Margaret. Huron 

46 McDaniel, Hallie A Miller 

47 ^IcClenon, Walter H Huron 

48 N elson, Anna Miller 

49 Neumeyer, Gertrude Alpena 

50 Ohlson. Hattie Artesian 

51 Orth, Lucy Elkton 

52 Persson, Anna M Onida 

53 Peters, J. H Minneapolis, Minn. 

54 Quinn, Margie Doland 

55 Radcliffe, Amy Wolsey 

56 Rand, Grace A Huron 

57 Raven, Myrtle O Huron 

58 Schnetzer, Esther Bonilla 

59 Scott, Emma Miller 

60 Sheldon, Geo. F ^t. Lawrence 

61 Small, Gale Winthrop 

62 Snediger, Tessie O Huron 

63 Spooner, Mrs. Leonoire Lake Preston 

64 Tredway, Floy Huron 

65 Trotman, Fannie Burdette 

66 Tubandt, Agnes Redfield 

67 Van Delinder, Ada Hitchcock 

68 W alder, Emily Hayti 

69 Walder, Hans Hayti 

70 Weeks, Ethel St. Lawrence 

71 Wenrick, Mamie Ree Heights 

72 Wood, Olive Huron 



66 Huron College, Huron, S. D. 

SUMMARY 

College 24 

Academy 48 

Normal 34 

Piano, Organ, Voice 40 

Violin 14 

Art : 19 

Commercial 42 

Shorthand , 24 

Summer School 72 

Total 317 

Counted twice 27 

Net total 290 



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